Wizards’ 3 biggest needs entering 2022 NBA Draft

The Washington Wizards enjoyed many successes as they were led by John Wall and Bradley Beal and made the playoffs four out of five years from 2014-2018. Since this iteration of the Wizards, there have been several struggles with roster formation, injuries, and team chemistry. Wall is long gone, while Beal the star remains in place…at least for now.

Missing the playoffs again could be disheartening for a star like Beal at the peak of his career, but he continues to demonstrate his loyalty to the organization and it seems like he’s sticking with it. The addition of youngsters like Kyle Kuzma, Rui Hachimura, Deni Avdija and Corey Kispert gives a semblance of hope to the core of Bradley Beal and Kristaps Porzingis.

However, more help is needed. Washington has the #10 and #54 picks for the 2022 NBA draft, and these are the prototype players they must consider in order to build a stronger roster.

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Wizards needs in the 2022 NBA Draft

Point Guard

Any sort of point guard would greatly benefit this Wizards list. The swapping of Russell Westbrook and Spencer Dinwiddie the last two seasons has opened up a huge hole at the 1, with Ish Smith being the only remaining floor general currently on their payroll for next season. The key for the Wizards front office is to find the orchestrator that might fit their system.

It’s proven that Bradley Beal and Kyle Kuzma thrive when they have a fantastic point guard who could use them for better looks. This class is deeper on the wings and forward positions, but picking Dyson Daniels as the 6-foot-7-point guard could be the move for Washington. Free reign could also be the game when it comes to acquiring a point guard, but picking a guard could still be a player development project for their franchise.

Versatile forward

The above names Kuzma, Hachimura, Avdija and Kispert are all forwards but they need a bulkier forward who can beat it with the likes of Anthony Davis or Jaren Jackson Jr. There are some combo forwards that have guard-like abilities but could also play on the small ball center spot for the Wizards. Kristaps Porzingis and Daniel Gafford are likely to fill the big man position, but they will struggle to keep up with a modern big man’s playstyle.

Jeremy Sochan or Keegan Murray would complement Washington’s core because of their spectacular engines and determination to play at the collegiate level. Playing this combo forward position for a struggling Wizards roster requires excellent two-way skills that would force coach Wes Unseld Jr. to keep them grounded.

Big Shot Creator

With the point guard’s position somewhat limited in the lottery for this year’s class, the Wizards could settle for a wing that brings the ball down and creates shots for their teammates. The prototype that would suit this style is French Ousmane Dieng. He wouldn’t take away from Kyle Kuzma or Kentavious Caldwell-Pope’s playing time, but he could play alongside Beal because of his tremendous ball-handling ability.

With veterans on the list, there’s no rush for their blueprint choices to have an immediate impact. The most important ingredient is that he has the right attitude and mindset that is sustainable at the NBA level. Whoever that man would be would be playing behind tenured and distinguished individuals with a remarkable track record at the professional level. Additionally, their willingness to become an all-rounder at the forward position is another key facet that would excel at the club.

Washington has the fundamentals to become a consistent playoff threat in the East, but they must continue to add additional players to support the key figures already in place.

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