space traveling warriors tier list : King County launches the state’s first battery-electric heavy truck built in Renton, opening a new market for zero-emission fleets

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Video of King County Battery Electric Truck at Kenworth Factory in Renton

King County today became the first organization in the state to launch a new model of battery-electric heavy-duty truck manufactured at Kenworth’s assembly plant in Renton, opening a new market for zero-emission fleets.

It will be one of the first Class 8 battery electric trucks in North America operated by a waste management agency. Along with King County Metro’s progress in electrifying its bus fleet, King County is a leader in the transition to zero-emission vehicles that reduce air and noise pollution.

“We are once again catalyzing new markets to accelerate the transition to zero-emission fleets, this time with heavy-duty trucks built right here in King County,” said Dow Constantine, King County executive. “By leveraging the purchasing power of one of the largest municipalities in the country, we are proving to manufacturers that there is strong demand for vehicles that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce maintenance costs, improve air quality and reduce noise pollution.”

“We are entering an exciting new time in the trucking industry,” said Jim Walenczak, assistant general manager of sales and marketing for Kenworth. “It was great to meet the King County representatives and take them on a tour to show how these new battery electric vehicles are built at the Kenworth Renton factory. We thank King County for their business and look forward to seeing this new Kenworth T680E on the road.”

King County’s Solid Waste Division will use the new zero-emission commercial truck to transport materials from its Enumclaw Recycling and Transfer Station to the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill in Maple Valley. The pilot project will provide employees with operational experience while also measuring the performance of the battery-powered tractor-trailer combination for solid waste transfer.

A cost-benefit analysis by the Solid Waste Division estimates that maintaining and operating a Kenworth T680E Truck will cost less than maintaining and operating a diesel truck. In addition to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, it will reduce the amount of toxic diesel particulate matter emitted in South King County, where communities are disproportionately affected by air pollution. The quieter model will also reduce noise pollution.

The battery powering the 536-horsepower engine can be recharged in about three hours at the new charging station at Cedar Hills Regional Landfill. The truck, carrying 20 tons, can easily reach 100 km/h and travel around 240 km on a single charge.

A King County ordinance has set a goal for 50% of its heavy truck fleet to be electric by 2038, contributing to the county’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its operations by 80% by 2030.

“We need to step on the gas in the transition of big trucks from dirty diesel to electric. It’s one of the most important steps we can take to reduce climate and air pollution,” said Gregg Small, Executive Director of Climate Solutions. “And we generate high-paying jobs by manufacturing these clean solutions right here in Washington state. King County’s commitment to purchase this all-electric Kenworth truck for use in our community is a big step in helping our lungs, our climate and our economy. We are urging policymakers to strive for the electrification of large vehicles, implementing policies and more incentives for these win-win solutions.”

Helping to cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by the end of this decade

Washington, unlike California and some other states, currently does not offer any incentives for purchasing zero-emission heavy trucks. The Solid Waste Division has purchased its first model now to contribute to King County’s 2020 Strategic Climate Action Plan goals to cut countywide greenhouse gas emissions in half by the end of this decade.

The purchase builds on momentum set by King County Metro, which is advancing its goal of having 100% of its bus fleet powered by renewable energy by 2035.

A directive from Executive Constantine has placed a moratorium on county agencies on the purchase of light vehicles powered by internal combustion engines as the county scales up its fleet electrification initiatives.

The transition to electric-powered heavy trucks on a regional scale has the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A 2019 study by King County found that 16% of greenhouse gas emissions on roads are generated by freight and service vehicles.

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We are once again catalyzing new markets to accelerate the transition to zero-emission fleets, this time with reliable heavy-duty trucks built right here in King County. By leveraging the purchasing power of one of the largest municipalities in the country, we are proving to manufacturers that there is strong demand for vehicles that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce maintenance costs, improve air quality and reduce pollution. sound.

Dow Constantine, King County Executive

We are entering a new and exciting time in the trucking industry. It was great to meet the King County representatives and take them on a tour to show them how these new battery electric vehicles are built at the Kenworth Renton factory. We thank King County for their business and look forward to seeing this new Kenworth T680E on the road.

Jim Walenczak, Assistant General Manager of Sales and Marketing at Kenworth

We need to step on the gas in the transition from big trucks from dirty diesel to all-electric. It’s one of the most important steps we can take to reduce climate and air pollution, and we create high-paying jobs manufacturing these clean solutions right here in Washington state. King County’s commitment to purchase this all-electric Kenworth truck for use in our community is a big step in helping our lungs, our climate and our economy. We’re asking policymakers to be big on electrifying big vehicles, implementing policies and more incentives for these win-win solutions.

Gregg Small, Executive Director of Climate Solutions

For more information contact us:

Annie Kolb-Nelson, King County Solid Waste Division, 206-477-5373
Jeff Parietti, Kenworth, 206-828-5196


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