Jared Bednar reacts to controversial missed call in OT

The Colorado Avalanche won Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Finals thanks to an overtime goal by Nazem Kadri. The goal wasn’t without controversy, however, as Lightning and head coach Jon Cooper were quick to claim that the umpires should have blown the game dead because of a penalty from too many men. Avs head coach Jared Bednar has now commented on the controversial goal and said he saw nothing wrong with the game, suggesting tight line changes are common during a hockey game. about Michael Traikos.

“I saw it. I thought it was nothing, honestly. I thought it happened every other shift throughout the game,” Bednar said. “It’s part of the game. It’s a fluid game. You change on the fly, everything happens You watch this clip, you save this clip — and I’ve already done it multiple times to see exactly what they’re talking about — and Tampa has two guys jumping up with their D coming from a zone away from the ice . I’ll count 7-6 once. So that’s it. That’s how the game is played. I don’t see it as a break or a non-break. I don’t really see it as anything.”

The goal in question came after a rather questionable change of line, with Kadri coming off the bench just before reaching Nathan MacKinnon’s touchline. Kadri then broke away in the attacking third and conceded the game-winning goal.

NHL rules state that a player must be within five feet of the bench before another player can replace him on the ice. It’s clear Kadri left the bench early, but as Bednar notes, he felt the Blitz had too many men on the ice during that very game as well. filming showed also a questionable line change by Lightning involving two of their defenders.

It was certainly a controversial goal and it’s not too surprising to hear Bednar taking that stance in this instance. Of course, Lightning fans will have different opinions, but at the end of the day, the Avalanche got the benefit of the doubt and now lead 3-1.

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