Hiker hurt in avalanche on South Sister OR

A 23-year-old climber who was injured after triggering a small avalanche on Oregon's South Sister Peak in 2018 had to wait overnight for rescue, officials say.

A 23-year-old climber who was injured after triggering a small avalanche on Oregon’s South Sister Peak in 2018 had to wait overnight for rescue, officials say.

Associated Press File

A climber injured in a fall after triggering a small avalanche on Oregon’s South Sister had to be airlifted from the summit the next morning, officials say.

The 23-year-old man from Ithaca, NY, called 911 at 6:54 p.m. local time on Saturday, June 18 to report that the avalanche caused him to fall down the north face of the 10,358-foot mountain, the statement said Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office in a news release Sunday.

Poor weather conditions prevented rescuers from sending a helicopter and the terrain was too treacherous for a night ground rescue, officials said.

The man, who had a tent and a sleeping bag, settled down to await rescue, the press release said. A ground team set out at 1 a.m. to scale the 9,100 feet to the injured hiker.

Rescuers reached the man at 8:50 a.m. Sunday, June 19, and took him to a glacier where an Oregon Army National Guard helicopter was able to take him to safety.

The helicopter picked up the injured walker around 11:30 a.m. and flew him to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend. The dismissal did not contain any information about his health status.

South Sister, the third tallest mountain in Oregon, is the tallest of the Three Sisters.

Don Sweeney has been a newspaper reporter and editor in California for more than 25 years. He has been a real-time reporter at The Sacramento Bee since 2016.

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