3 best Knicks trades using No. 11 pick in 2022 NBA Draft

The 2022 NBA draft lottery put the New York Knicks right back where they should be, giving them the 11th pick after having the 11th-best chance of picking the first overall.

Now the Knicks have many avenues they could take in the offseason. With the 11th pick in the draft, they could add another young player to their core or make a trade around the pick.

The best kinds of trades the Knicks can make are ones that help them get young, high-ranking players or more draft capital. They might have made the playoffs last season, but they have to realize that unless they can bring on a young star, slow rebuilding is the best way forward.

The 3 best Knicks trades with the #11 in the 2022 NBA draft

3. Move up in draft

The Portland Trail Blazers are one of those rare teams to make the top 10 in the NBA draft but are in win-now mode. With Damian Lillard coming back next season, they could strike a deal that will give them more value for their seventh overall pick.

The Knicks could trade the 11th pick, 42nd pick and Evan Fournier for the 7th pick and Eric Bledsoe.

For New York, they move up significantly into the top 10 of the draft by also relinquishing their second-round picks. With a higher selection, your chances of finding a future star improve. They also release salary by sending Fournier to the Blazers. They would have to be without Bledsoe before June 29 to save over $15 million. They could also hold him if they wish to make another trade in the future.

Portland would have an extra draft pick to trade and a sniper to surround Lillard with. They could also opt to field Fournier as a sixth man, giving him free rein to make shots while Lillard and Anfernee Simons rest. With three picks in the draft, they could make multiple trades or pack them up to add a star.

2. Swap Bigs

The Atlanta Hawks have been dealing with John Collins trade rumors for some time. They were finally able to move on from their disgruntled forward by trading Collins, the 16th overall and a future pick (perhaps the 2024 Oklahoma City Thunder second-round pick) for Julius Randle and the 11th overall to the Knicks.

Although Randle is older than Collins and has had a very disappointing season, he could thrive in Atlanta. Letting Trae Young take the pressure off would help a lot. Randle would provide a playmaker crease the Hawks could capitalize on and could again shoot the deep ball at a respectable rate if Young sets it up.

The Knicks would move down five spots to bring in Collins, a younger player on a slightly cheaper contract who would be a huge compliment to Mitchell Robinson up front, assuming he stays in New York. Because he’s less of a ball dominator but still able to score in a variety of ways, he should be a solid part of their offense. Leaning on RJ Barrett means surrounding him with the right pieces. Collins, a high flyer who can shoot from deep, could be one.

1. Donovan Mitchell’s Blockbuster Trade

If the Utah Jazz are genuinely interested in moving Donovan Mitchell, their discussions with opposing teams begin with draft capital. The Knicks would start with the 11th overall pick and contain several other first-round picks. New York would send Fournier and Derrick Rose to help make the trade financially viable.

Adding Mitchell to the Knicks’ young core would make them significantly better. The All-Star would be a huge compliment to Barrett, a rising star in his own right. Although the clamor surrounding Mitchell’s path to the Knicks is all rumor at the moment, New York should definitely consider taking on the young star. There’s no quicker way to build yourself into a good team than trading for the young goalscorer.

Utah would certainly be looking for a higher pick than 11th overall, but New York can overcome that by offering them more picks than opposing teams. Fournier and Rose would add a solid score to their depth. The Knicks would be in a jam-packed race for Mithell, or there might not be one at all, but there’s no harm in trying.

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